roadhawg1:

Civil War Front Line in Nashville
A photograph of Nashville, Tennessee Federal Front Lines. It was created in 1864 by Barnard, George N., 1819-1902.
The photo illustrates the War in the West. These photographs are of Hood before Nashville. Continuing his policy of the offensive at any cost, Gen. John B. Hood brought his reduced army before the defenses of Nashville, where it was overthrown by Gen. George H. Thomas on December 15-16, in the most complete victory of the war. If the date borne on this photograph is correct, it was taken in the course of the battle.

roadhawg1:

Civil War Front Line in Nashville

A photograph of Nashville, Tennessee Federal Front Lines. It was created in 1864 by Barnard, George N., 1819-1902.

The photo illustrates the War in the West. These photographs are of Hood before Nashville. Continuing his policy of the offensive at any cost, Gen. John B. Hood brought his reduced army before the defenses of Nashville, where it was overthrown by Gen. George H. Thomas on December 15-16, in the most complete victory of the war. If the date borne on this photograph is correct, it was taken in the course of the battle.

(via piratetreasure)

Need, Use or Love

peterkearns:

I’ve been selling most of my personal possessions, keeping only the items that I absolutely need, use or love. I find that with each departing object, whether the item be a sweater that I never wore, a book I never read, or a flashlight I never used, I feel a sense of joy and new found freedom. The feeling is inspiring but frightening at the same time.

Fully support this. The lady and I try to do this on a constant basis. Having a5 month old and family and friends continually giving us stuff makes it hard, but you still got to cull that stuff. They won’t hate you.

thirtymilesout:

Frank “Pistol Pete” Eaton (October 26, 1860 – April 8, 1958)
    Francis Boardman Eaton was born on October 26, 1860, in Hartford, Connecticut.  In 1868, the Eaton family joined the rush to Kansas homesteading eight miles west of Carbondale. The Eatons built their home on the sight of an old hotel along the trail left by Quantrill’s raiders on their retreat to Lawrence.  It was there the eight year old Frank saw his father gunned down in the moonlight by a lawless gang of Southerners who called themselves the Regulators.  Moses Beaman, his father’s friend and neighbor, told young Frank, “My boy, may an old man’s curse rest on you the longest day you live if you don’t find and shoot the men that murdered your father.”
   Beaman gave Eaton his first gun, an old Dragoon cap n’ ball pistol. Eaton referred to Moses Beaman as “the man who learned me how to shoot.” Soon he was so proficient that he could shoot the head off a rattlesnake with either hand by merely “point firing.” In 1875 Frank went to Fort Gibson to see what the 6th Cavalry soldiers could teach him. He outshot everyone at the fort and Colonel Copinger, commander of the fort, gave him a badge for his marksmanship. The Colonel also gave him the nickname “Pistol Pete”.
   Eaton’s quest for his fathers’ killers began in earnest in 1887 when within 3 months he had accounted for 3 of the murderers. He learned that two of his fathers killers, Doc Ferber and Shannon Campsey, were living in a cabin along the Canadian River southwest of Webbers Falls, (indian Terriory). Eaton rode into the clearing where the cabin was located and saw Campsey grabbing a rifle on the porch. Frank called out, “Hello, Shan, don’t you know me?”. Campsey took aim but Eaton’s fast draw left him dead on the front porch. Eaton rode off in search of Doc Ferber and found him working cattle in a nearby clearing. Eaton shot him off of his horse with “two forty-five slugs through his breast”. Both Ferber and Campsey were known cattle thieves and for his action against them Eaton was hired as a detective by the Cattlemen’s Association.
  Eaton then set off to find Doc Ferber’s brother John, who had been helping sell the stolen cattle in Missouri. The night before he arrived, Ferber was killed for stealing a jack from the bottom of a deck in a poker game. Eaton attended his funeral to make sure he was dead. While attending the funeral he learned that Jim and Jonce Campsey had a small ranch in the Ozarks. Eaton found the brothers at home and challenged them to a duel, killing both of them only feet apart.
  Eaton then got wind that Wyley Campsey was tending bar in Albuquerque. With the help of Pat Garrett, Eaton rode off to the west where they found Wyley and two of his hirelings at the bar. Eaton ordered Campsey to “fill your hand, you son of a bitch!” shooting him twice through the heart as he reached for his gun under the bar. The two guards wounded Eaton shooting him in the leg and in his left arm. Garrett helped Frank and saw to it he received help from friends out of town.
In 1923, students at Oklahoma A & M College, now Oklahoma State University, asked Eaton to pose as the school’s mascot after seeing him in an Armistice Day parade.  Eaton agreed and became the “original cowboy” and living symbol of Oklahoma State University until his death.  His likeness was also adopted as the mascot of the University of Wyoming and New Mexico State University.
Hopefully y’all will have a new appreciation for OSU’s Pistol Pete mascot.

thirtymilesout:

Frank “Pistol Pete” Eaton (October 26, 1860 – April 8, 1958)

    Francis Boardman Eaton was born on October 26, 1860, in Hartford, Connecticut.  In 1868, the Eaton family joined the rush to Kansas homesteading eight miles west of Carbondale. The Eatons built their home on the sight of an old hotel along the trail left by Quantrill’s raiders on their retreat to Lawrence.  It was there the eight year old Frank saw his father gunned down in the moonlight by a lawless gang of Southerners who called themselves the Regulators.  Moses Beaman, his father’s friend and neighbor, told young Frank, “My boy, may an old man’s curse rest on you the longest day you live if you don’t find and shoot the men that murdered your father.”

   Beaman gave Eaton his first gun, an old Dragoon cap n’ ball pistol. Eaton referred to Moses Beaman as “the man who learned me how to shoot.” Soon he was so proficient that he could shoot the head off a rattlesnake with either hand by merely “point firing.” In 1875 Frank went to Fort Gibson to see what the 6th Cavalry soldiers could teach him. He outshot everyone at the fort and Colonel Copinger, commander of the fort, gave him a badge for his marksmanship. The Colonel also gave him the nickname “Pistol Pete”.

   Eaton’s quest for his fathers’ killers began in earnest in 1887 when within 3 months he had accounted for 3 of the murderers. He learned that two of his fathers killers, Doc Ferber and Shannon Campsey, were living in a cabin along the Canadian River southwest of Webbers Falls, (indian Terriory). Eaton rode into the clearing where the cabin was located and saw Campsey grabbing a rifle on the porch. Frank called out, “Hello, Shan, don’t you know me?”. Campsey took aim but Eaton’s fast draw left him dead on the front porch. Eaton rode off in search of Doc Ferber and found him working cattle in a nearby clearing. Eaton shot him off of his horse with “two forty-five slugs through his breast”. Both Ferber and Campsey were known cattle thieves and for his action against them Eaton was hired as a detective by the Cattlemen’s Association.

  Eaton then set off to find Doc Ferber’s brother John, who had been helping sell the stolen cattle in Missouri. The night before he arrived, Ferber was killed for stealing a jack from the bottom of a deck in a poker game. Eaton attended his funeral to make sure he was dead. While attending the funeral he learned that Jim and Jonce Campsey had a small ranch in the Ozarks. Eaton found the brothers at home and challenged them to a duel, killing both of them only feet apart.

  Eaton then got wind that Wyley Campsey was tending bar in Albuquerque. With the help of Pat Garrett, Eaton rode off to the west where they found Wyley and two of his hirelings at the bar. Eaton ordered Campsey to “fill your hand, you son of a bitch!” shooting him twice through the heart as he reached for his gun under the bar. The two guards wounded Eaton shooting him in the leg and in his left arm. Garrett helped Frank and saw to it he received help from friends out of town.

In 1923, students at Oklahoma A & M College, now Oklahoma State University, asked Eaton to pose as the school’s mascot after seeing him in an Armistice Day parade.  Eaton agreed and became the “original cowboy” and living symbol of Oklahoma State University until his death.  His likeness was also adopted as the mascot of the University of Wyoming and New Mexico State University.

Hopefully y’all will have a new appreciation for OSU’s Pistol Pete mascot.

(via thirtymilesout)

thecivilwarparlor:

He Was Killed At The Battle of Gettysburg And May Now Be Close To Receiving The Medal Of Honor in 2014! - Holding His Intestines With One Hand, Cushing Refused To Leave His Cannons And His Men
(As of March 2014, the nomination awaits review by the Defense Department before being approved by President Barack Obama)
Margaret Zerwekh thought Alonzo Cushing deserved the Medal of Honor. So she wrote a letter to her congressman to correct what she thought was an injustice. That was more than three decades ago. Zerwekh is now 93, and Cushing appears to be on the verge of receiving the nation’s highest honor for valor. Tucked deep in the defense bill passed is a provision to posthumously award the Medal of Honor to Cushing, an artillery officer from Delafield killed at the Battle of Gettysburg. Zerwekh can’t remember when she wrote her first letter on behalf of Cushing to then-Sen. William Proxmire, but it was sometime in the 1980s.
Among the many men who died in the nation’s bloodiest battle was Cushing, a first lieutenant in charge of an artillery battery of six cannons and 110 men. On July 3, 1863, the third and final day of the Battle of Gettysburg, Cushing and his soldiers in Battery A, 4th U.S. Artillery, were stationed near a small grove of trees in a spot known as “the Angle” because of a nearby stone fence.
The Angle bore the brunt of the tragic and misguided gamble known as Pickett’s Charge. Before Confederate soldiers were sent to their deaths in the charge, Confederate artillery launched a ferocious bombardment that decimated Cushing’s unit. When it stopped, Cushing had only two working cannons and a few soldiers still standing. In the cannonade, a shell fragment pierced Cushing’s shoulder and shrapnel tore through his abdomen and groin. Holding his intestines with one hand, Cushing refused to leave his cannons and his men.
Battery A moved the two remaining guns to a stone wall and blasted away at the charging Confederates. A few seconds after he yelled “I will give them one more shot,” Cushing was struck in the mouth by a bullet that killed him instantly.
He was 22.
Cushing’s body was returned to his family in Delafield, and they buried him at West Point beneath a tombstone inscribed “Faithful until death.”
Read more from Journal Sentinel: http://www.jsonline.com/news/wisconsin/decades-long-quest-to-honor-civil-war-hero-alonzo-cushing-nears-success-b99170796z1-237192961.html#ixzz2wYdXhX2q  WIKI http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alonzo_Cushing
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Give-Alonzo-Cushing-the-Medal-of-Honor/309383145145

That is one bad-ass 22 year old.  I’m glad he (and his family) will get the recognition he deserves.

thecivilwarparlor:

He Was Killed At The Battle of Gettysburg And May Now Be Close To Receiving The Medal Of Honor in 2014! - Holding His Intestines With One Hand, Cushing Refused To Leave His Cannons And His Men

  • (As of March 2014, the nomination awaits review by the Defense Department before being approved by President Barack Obama)

Margaret Zerwekh thought Alonzo Cushing deserved the Medal of Honor. So she wrote a letter to her congressman to correct what she thought was an injustice. That was more than three decades ago. Zerwekh is now 93, and Cushing appears to be on the verge of receiving the nation’s highest honor for valor. Tucked deep in the defense bill passed is a provision to posthumously award the Medal of Honor to Cushing, an artillery officer from Delafield killed at the Battle of Gettysburg. Zerwekh can’t remember when she wrote her first letter on behalf of Cushing to then-Sen. William Proxmire, but it was sometime in the 1980s.

Among the many men who died in the nation’s bloodiest battle was Cushing, a first lieutenant in charge of an artillery battery of six cannons and 110 men. On July 3, 1863, the third and final day of the Battle of Gettysburg, Cushing and his soldiers in Battery A, 4th U.S. Artillery, were stationed near a small grove of trees in a spot known as “the Angle” because of a nearby stone fence.

The Angle bore the brunt of the tragic and misguided gamble known as Pickett’s Charge. Before Confederate soldiers were sent to their deaths in the charge, Confederate artillery launched a ferocious bombardment that decimated Cushing’s unit. When it stopped, Cushing had only two working cannons and a few soldiers still standing. In the cannonade, a shell fragment pierced Cushing’s shoulder and shrapnel tore through his abdomen and groin. Holding his intestines with one hand, Cushing refused to leave his cannons and his men.

Battery A moved the two remaining guns to a stone wall and blasted away at the charging Confederates. A few seconds after he yelled “I will give them one more shot,” Cushing was struck in the mouth by a bullet that killed him instantly.

He was 22.

Cushing’s body was returned to his family in Delafield, and they buried him at West Point beneath a tombstone inscribed “Faithful until death.”

Read more from Journal Sentinel: http://www.jsonline.com/news/wisconsin/decades-long-quest-to-honor-civil-war-hero-alonzo-cushing-nears-success-b99170796z1-237192961.html#ixzz2wYdXhX2q  WIKI http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alonzo_Cushing

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Give-Alonzo-Cushing-the-Medal-of-Honor/309383145145

That is one bad-ass 22 year old.  I’m glad he (and his family) will get the recognition he deserves.