Patagonia Rock Craft Pants Review

Patagonia Rock Craft Pants, Rockwall $79

http://www.patagonia.com/us/product/mens-rock-craft-pants-sun-protection?p=58255-0






Picture Credit: Patagonia: http://topodesigns.com/collection/mountain-briefcase/

 

Wonder Pants.  Magic Pants.  They have a few nicknames around here, but no matter what I call them, they are awesome pants to own and wear.  At first I was just looking for a solid pair of outdoor pants to use when hiking and doing Search and Rescue training. These pants meet my needs and more.  I wear them all the time (work trips, outdoors, climbing gym, regular gym, couch, sitting here now) and they are my go to pants for any trip (no matter the destination or activity).  

 

Made up of 96% nylon and 4% spandex, along with DWR (durable water repellent) finish, they can take just about any abuse and look good doing it.  They don’t take up much room, are wrinkle resistant. If you need only one pair of pants, these are a great choice.  Go with the Rockwall color since it looks less technical and you can wear it most places.



Pros: Versatile and Tough.  Wear wear them in the woods, on travel, or take on a business trip for your casual pants.  

 

Cons: After more than a year of wear in all sorts of environments, these are showing some wear and tear, but are still nice enough looking to take on trips or wear around town.

 

Where to wear: The woods, casual office, urban exploring, weekend away, the couch.

 

Topo Designs Mountain Briefcase Review

Topo Designs Mountain Briefcase, Black $149+

http://topodesigns.com/collection/mountain-briefcase/




Picture Credit: Topo Designs: http://topodesigns.com/collection/mountain-briefcase/

 

The search for my perfect ‘work bag’ was a long one. I tried it all, but nothing worked, until I found out about the Designs Mountain Briefcase.  This bag looks and performs great when I’m wearing a suit for work, and it rises to the challenges when I take it for a romp in the woods.

 

The bag is small and slim (11″h x 16″w x 4.5″d) but really well designed so it carries what you need and carries it well.  It comes with a strap for a messenger bag type carry, but the main feature is the two shoulder straps tucked away in their own pocket.  Pull them out and attach them, and now you have a small backpack for when you got to be nimble and handsfree. A tough Cordura outside will protect your stuff, and the bright yellow interior (with laptop sleeve and pockets) will keep everything neat and accessible. Spring for the sternum strap ($12 extra) and you’ll be able to carry the load a bit easier.




Pros: Versatile, work to weekend with the same bag, tough, great design, Made in the USA.

 

Cons: Becuase of the extra lash tabs and tough design, its easy to pack more weight than the bag was intended to carry.  Keep your load focused and get the sternum strap and everything will be great.


Where to wear: The woods, office, weekend away.  On your back, in your hand, or across your shoulder.

awkwardsituationist:

photos* by peter mather in ni’iinlii’njik territorial park, an arctic oasis dead centre on the arctic circle in canada’s yukon territory. the forest resembles a coastal temperate zone due to nitrogen that finds it’s way from the dead salmon into the ecosystem. salmon literally feed the entire ecosystem, from birds, bears and wolves to moss and trees - trees which tower over anything in the surrounding stunted black spruce forest and vast tundra.

ni’iinlii’njik, which means “where salmon spawn” in gwich’in, marks the end of a 1500 mile salmon migration upriver from the pacific ocean. in 1986, the first salmon count in ni’iinlii’njik was over 350,000 fish, but in recent years has dropped as low as 9,000 due to human mismanagement. the chum salmon run this year is expected to be around 35,000. of note, the grizzly bears who feed on the salmon are known as “ice bears” for the icicles that form on their hair when hunting in temperatures that drop below minus 20 celsius.

(*is the fifth picture overhead or underwater? i’m baffled either way)

(via driftingfocus)

thecountryfucker:

I got to spend a day hiking through the canyons of Mt. Tam with the Juniper Ridge folks. 
This is Hall talking about popping “zits” on these Doug Firs to get to the sap and that Doug Fir smell.
More to come but I have to say he, Obi, and the rest of the crew are really special dudes who practice what they preach. It was one of the most memorable days I have had in the woods. Hall took me back to the first time my Uncle walked me through the sugar bush when I was a wee fucker. I learned so much and felt so good. Great fucking day. 

Sounds like a good time.  Also doesnt look butt cold, like it is here in TN.

thecountryfucker:

I got to spend a day hiking through the canyons of Mt. Tam with the Juniper Ridge folks. 

This is Hall talking about popping “zits” on these Doug Firs to get to the sap and that Doug Fir smell.

More to come but I have to say he, Obi, and the rest of the crew are really special dudes who practice what they preach. It was one of the most memorable days I have had in the woods. Hall took me back to the first time my Uncle walked me through the sugar bush when I was a wee fucker. I learned so much and felt so good. Great fucking day. 

Sounds like a good time.  Also doesnt look butt cold, like it is here in TN.

theruggedclub:

I acquired this old photo I had printed from some glass plates of a gamekeeper and estate life. It is from the late 19th-century/early 20th-century. The camera was too slow to capture his mythical two-headed fidgeting setter. Beautiful nonetheless.

theruggedclub:

I acquired this old photo I had printed from some glass plates of a gamekeeper and estate life. It is from the late 19th-century/early 20th-century. The camera was too slow to capture his mythical two-headed fidgeting setter. Beautiful nonetheless.